RE/MAX 440
Cheryl Goedeke
701 W. Market Street
Perkasie, PA   18944
Phone: 267-664-2288
Office Phone: 215-453-7653
Fax: 267-354-6833
email: cheryl@remax440.com
Cheryl Goedeke

My Blog

6 Bathroom Safety Additions for Seniors

June 15, 2015 1:03 am

Nearly one in three people over the age of 65 experiences an accidental fall each year, according to statistics from the CDC, and more than half occur in the home. To protect seniors from hazards, the experts at Roto-Rooter recommend the following bathroom safety additions:

• Equip showers and surrounding walls with sturdy grab bars. These should be anchored to wall studs so they will support the full weight of an adult. Some safety handles use super strong suction cups that are easy to apply and remove.

• Consider installing non-skid tape or mats in showers and bathtubs.

• A shower chair is also a safe solution that can be easily placed when balance is a challenge.

• Flexible handheld shower wands with an on/off button might be easier to use than a traditional shower head. These are especially useful in combination with shower chairs.

• Toilets can be replaced with ADA-approved raised-height models to lessen the chance of a fall. Additionally, raised-height seats can be installed on existing toilets.

• Check temperature settings on water heaters, as water over 120 degrees Fahrenheit can scald skin. Special no-scald faucets or a no-scald regulator can be installed as a secondary layer of protection.

Source:
RotoRooter.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Empty Nesters: How to Reclaim Your Space

June 15, 2015 1:03 am

(BPT) – The departure of children from the home may be bittersweet, but it is also an opportunity for empty nesters to reclaim their space. Updating the home after the kids move out with savvy improvements can help facilitate aging in place and boost resale value for those planning to downsize in the future.

If your children have left the nest, consider these home projects:

1. Find Your “Me” Space


Turn junior’s room into a space that works for you, like a home office, exercise room, music studio, craft room, workshop or home theater. Keep in mind your long-term plans. If you'll be selling the home at some point, consider a room that will have broader appeal, like a home office.

If you plan to age in place, remember to incorporate features in your “me” space that will facilitate your use of the room even if you experience mobility issues down the road. For example, you may want to take the opportunity to widen doorways, replace doorknobs with door handles, replace loose carpet or slippery tiles with slip-resistant flooring, and improve ventilation.

2. Embrace Natural Lighting


Vision changes as you age, so the artificial lighting that worked for you when you were in your 30s or 40s may not be adequate when you enter your 50s and 60s. Lighting is an important upgrade if you plan to remain in your home into your golden years. Look for improvements that will help aging eyes see better, like increased natural lighting and task lighting in work areas.

3. Create a Bathroom Retreat


Bathrooms sell homes, and if you've lived with an outdated master bathroom - or none at all - now's the time to renovate. In addition to all the luxurious features you've been dreaming of, like a rainfall shower head and heated floor, keep in mind the practical improvements that will make the room safe and usable as you grow older.

Look for slip-resistant flooring, improve natural and task lighting and replace faucet knobs with easy-to-maneuver levers. Install grab bars around tubs and toilets, as well as in the shower. Bath product designers are now making grab bars that offer the look of design elements coupled with the security of sturdy support.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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College Grads: Sidestep Financial Traps

June 12, 2015 12:58 am

Fiscal responsibility should be a top priority for anyone, but newly minted college graduates are more vulnerable to financial traps, say experts with the American Bankers Association (ABA). These traps, identified below, can hinder new grads from securing their financial future, including the ability to purchase a home.

Not Having a Budget – Simply put, don’t spend more than you make. Calculate the amount of money you’re taking home after taxes, then figure out how much money you can afford to spend each month while contributing to your savings. Be sure to factor in recurring expenses such as student loans, monthly rent, utilities, groceries, transportation expenses and car loans.

Forgoing an Emergency Fund – Make it a priority to set aside the equivalent of three to six months’ worth of living expenses. Start putting some money away immediately, no matter how small the amount. A bank savings account is a smart place to stash your cash for a rainy day.

Paying Bills Late – or Not at All – Each missed payment can hurt your credit history for up to seven years, and can affect your ability to obtain loans and the interest rates you pay for loans. Consider setting up automatic payments for regular expenses like student loans, car payments and phone bills.

Racking Up Debt
– Understand the responsibilities and benefits of credit. Shop around for a card that best suits your needs, and spend only what you can afford to pay back. It’s a great tool if you use it responsibly.

Not Thinking about the Future – It may seem odd since you’re likely just beginning your career, but now is the best time to start planning for retirement. Contribute to your employer’s 401(k) or similar account, especially if there is a company match. Invest enough to qualify for your company’s full match – it’s free money.

Source: ABA

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Millennials See Value in Homeownership

June 12, 2015 12:58 am

Refuting reports otherwise, recent research from the Urban Land Institute (ULI) suggests Millennials value homeownership as much as any other generation – and then some. According to the “Gen Y and Housing” report, almost half of Millennials who do own a home believe it is a good long-term investment, and nearly three quarters of Millennials who do not yet own a home expect to be homeowners in the next five years.

Millennials who do own a home also cite the stability, privacy and square footage as positives. The majority of Millennial homeowners live in single-family homes; just a fraction live in attached units or condominiums.

Those who do not yet own a home remain steadfast in their preferences for neighborhoods with urban characteristics, such as a high degree of walkability, transportation alternatives and accessibility to shopping and entertainment.

The ULI research also noted an emerging trend among Millennials in which homeowners live in households with three generations of family members, or share housing with roommates.

Source: ULI.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Top 10 Hurricane-Proofing Steps for Homeowners

June 12, 2015 12:58 am

There’s no doubt hurricanes can be devastating to both property and finances. Residents in hurricane-prone areas should prepare their properties and protect their finances sooner rather than later, advises Julie Rochman, president and CEO of the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS).

“Now is also the time for property owners to review their personal emergency plans and homeowners insurance, complete a home inventory if they haven’t already, and stock on up needed supplies so they are ready for a potential storm. Don’t wait until it’s too late,” Rochman cautions.

The IBHS recommends homeowners add these top 10 hurricane-proofing steps to their to-do list to avoid property damage or a financial disaster.

1. Re-adhere shingles to prevent water damage to your roof decking.

2. Secure soffits to the walls to keep them from blowing off and allowing wind-driven rain into your house.

3. Seal gaps in outer walls to prevent water from getting in.

4. Protect windows and doors against flying debris and pressurization with shutters or pre-cut shutter panels that can be put in place quickly.

5. Trim trees away from your home and remove any weak sections that might break off and fall or become flying debris.

6. Review your insurance policy to make sure you understand what is covered and what isn’t.

7. Check your coverage limits to ensure you can rebuild your home and replace your personal belongings.

8. Consider flood insurance because flooding is not covered by standard homeowners or renters insurance.

9. Check your hurricane/windstorm deductible and consider putting aside additional money to rebuild your home if the amount is high.

10. Update your home inventory to speed up the insurance claims process if you have damage. This will also be useful if you apply for disaster aid.

Source: DisasterSafety.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Eat Fresh: What Food Labels Really Mean

June 11, 2015 6:58 am

As more Americans seek to adopt healthy lifestyles, retailers have responded with a variety of food labels aimed at healthy eating. But what do all those buzz words really mean? Consumer Reports explains the science behind the labels:

“Fresh” – Genuinely fresh food products have either just been picked, gathered or produced, says the Food Marketing Institute. What fresh definitely doesn’t mean: frozen.

“Organic” – Foods dubbed organic are growing in popularity because the term is backed by the USDA, which certifies that the food item was produced within their guidelines. These include methods that cycle resources, conserve biodiversity and balance the ecosystem.

“Natural” – The USDA supports this label on egg products and meat and poultry, but producers can use it at their discretion on any item. For an item to truly be natural, it must be minimally process, contain no artificial ingredients, and be regulated by the USDA.

“Local” – Local is defined by the retailer, and as such, may not meet shopper expectations. A retailer typically labels items “local” if they came from somewhere in the state (à la Whole Foods), in bordering states, or within a specified perimeter around the distribution center.

“Artisan” – Fast food chains have been using the term artisan for years to distinguish their products from competitors, so identifying authentic artisan products can be a challenge. Food items categorized as artisan are generally not handmade, not small-batch or not high-quality, as the label suggests.

“Seasonal” – Experts at the Produce Marketing Association believe seasonal is a relative term. Because many produce items are imported from other regions, or even countries, items labeled seasonal may not truly be seasonally grown on farms in the area in which they’re sold.

Source: Consumer Reports

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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What to Consider before a Remodel

June 11, 2015 6:58 am

Many homeowners decide to remodel on a whim, but a number of factors must be evaluated thoroughly before taking on any project, says Sergei Kaminskiy, Kaminskiy Design and Remodel. It’s important to have a conversation, he says, about lifestyles, health issues, family growth plans, aging parents, work habits and other matters before beginning a remodel. To start, prioritize a list of the following for your remodeler.

Determine quality of life issues. Maybe you need more space and are considering a room addition or another level added to the home. Should you move or stay and remodel? For some, moving is not an option, due to a career, roots in the neighborhood or otherwise, and remodeling is the right choice.

Consider how long you plan to stay in the home. If it's short-term, decisions are much easier than to plan for 10-20 years. If you consider your home a legacy home that will be in your family for years, you will need to give consideration to current and future toddlers, teens and aging parents. If the home is long-term, it will make sense to use the best materials for roofing, flooring, surfaces since quality materials can last up to 100 years.

Evaluate the health and physical needs of your family. If you have an elder or you are an elderly couple and don't want to move to a retirement community, living on one level and avoiding stairs may be the best option. The same may be true if a family member has physical challenges. If this is the case, choose to turn a downstairs room or office into a bedroom with bath.

Calculate the cost of moving. Moving typically costs about 8-10 percent of the value of the current home. Don’t forget to add in the costs of upgrades like carpet, furniture, painting, etc., and you can easily see how it adds up even more.

Source:
KaminskiyHomeRemodeling.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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7 Ways to Wow Buyers with Outdoor Staging

June 11, 2015 6:58 am

As one of the busier times of year for real estate activity, summertime is ideal for sellers hoping to unload their homes for top dollar. If your home is on the market this summer, stand out from the pack with these outdoor staging tips, courtesy of the experts at Point2.com.

1. Invite Buyers In


It’s no secret curb appeal matters to buyers, but too often, minor details are overlooked when setting the stage out front. To roll out the welcome for buyers, replace your worn welcome mat with a summery alternative, and install large house numbers in a prominent location that can be viewed from the street.

2. Shine Up Windows

Cleaning windows inside and out can be taxing, but it makes a noticeable difference. For the exterior sides of the windows, scrub off any accumulated film from tree pollen and polish until glistening. Buyers will be pleased to see not only a sparkling home outside, but a light-filled interior as well.

3. Showcase Small-Scale Color

In lieu of a costly exterior paint job, choose specific areas outside to add pops of color. Window boxes bursting with blooms are often well-received by buyers, as well as container plantings. If the exterior could use refreshing, consider re-painting the front door before recruiting a professional to do the entire home.

4. Spotlight for Safety


Make sure the outdoor spaces around your home, including the front entrance, deck, patio, and walkways, are appropriately lit. Updated light fixtures are not only aesthetically pleasing, but are an added safety feature to the home.

5. Maintain the Landscape

A well-kept home speaks volumes to buyers, and the exterior is no exception. Whether you hire a professional landscaper or DIY, trim the lawn and any hedges – the latter can be a trip hazard if left untouched.

6. Deck Out the Deck

Whether your home features a deck, patio, porch or other outdoor living area, take time to power wash the surface to remove any debris. If your outdoor furniture is lacking, consider purchasing a fresh set, complete with all-weather cushions and pillows in vibrant colors.

7. Make Pool Picture-Perfect

Pools can be a make-or-break feature for buyers, so play it up as best you can. After having the pool cleaned by a professional, take care to skim the surface for any debris that accumulates between buyer visits. Be sure the pool cover, mechanized or otherwise, is free of damage and the filtering system is in proper working order.

Source: RISMedia’s Housecall

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Traveling? How to Thwart Vacation Scammers

June 10, 2015 12:58 am

(BPT) – Fact: Scammers, identity thieves and fraudsters rarely take a vacation, even when you do.

"When people plan vacations, they let their guard down," says David Barnhardt of Early Warning, a fraud prevention company. "Fraudsters know this, and they have a whole bag of tricks created specifically for people in a vacation frame of mind."

Enjoy your vacation, he says, but exercise good judgment. That suggestion mirrors similar advice offered by both the Better Business Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Their websites each devote pages of precautions about potential travel scams - some of which can happen long before you pack your suitcase.

Many pre-vacation scams, the FTC warns, can begin with unsolicited vacation e-mails announcing amazing travel deals. The agency says if an offer sounds too good to be true, be wary.

Barnhardt agrees. "If you get an e-mail announcing you have won a 'free' vacation, be careful," he says. "Chances are before long you will be asked to provide someone with a credit card number to confirm your reservation. You would be surprised how many people fall for that scam."

Credit card numbers are the gold-standard for many fraudsters, and one way to protect your card, Barnhardt advises, is to place a travel flag on your credit and debit cards. Those flags can help card issuers quickly identify suspicious charges.

"If charges are swiped outside of your vacation dates, it can signal a compromised card," he says.

That said, Barnhardt recommends travelers use credit cards instead of debit cards.

"Simply put, credit cards draw on credit lines, whereas a debit card hack means your money is actually withdrawn from your account," he says. "That can cause an overdraft, which means overdraft charges. You may get your money back, but it often means you may need to file a police report, which can be a huge headache, especially if you're overseas. Plus you may have to explain to your creditors why your payments were returned and work with your institution to get penalty fees reversed as well."

Credit cards are also the safer method of payment when you're asked to put a deposit on a vacation rental.

"If a website advertises a gorgeous house or condo and the property owner asks that you wire a deposit, a red flag should immediately go up," says Barnhardt. "Don't do it. Money wired is money gone. Unlike a credit card deposit, once you wire money, you cannot get it back."

And after you have arrived at your destination, it pays to stay alert. "Hotels and motels can be breeding grounds for fraud," says Barnhardt.

One prevalent travel scam the FTC warns about involves a late-night phone call to your room allegedly from the front desk at a hotel, motel or resort. The caller claims there is a problem with the credit card and asks the guest to read the number over the phone. The obvious solution: make a trip to the front desk to speak with someone in person.

Barnhardt also warns of another lodging-related credit card scam currently in vogue: fliers slid under hotel-room doors offering pizza delivered right to your room.

"This sounds great to a hungry traveler, but if you call and they ask for your credit card number, it's better to hang up the phone and ask the front desk to recommend local eateries," he says.

Don’t forget to exercise caution when logging onto the hotel's free Wi-Fi network, says Barnhardt.

"Just about every hotel and motel provides free Wi-Fi," he says. "But fraudsters have perfected the art of mimicking legitimate networks. Logging onto a fake Wi-Fi network can put all the data stored in your tablet or phone in jeopardy."

Once again, he says, the best solution is to ask before acting.

"Check with the front desk," he says. "Make sure you are using the hotel's authorized network and they've supplied you with a secure Wi-Fi password. A bogus Wi-Fi can be outsmarted just by being cautious. Vacation time is about relaxing, but don't relax your common sense."

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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The Great Debate: Saltwater vs. Chlorine Pools

June 10, 2015 12:58 am

(Family Features) For many families, some of the most anticipated summertime activities happen around the pool. Both chlorine and saltwater pools are common in homes today, but there are distinct differences between the two. In a saltwater pool, chlorine is produced by a salt chlorine generator, rather than adding chlorine to the pool directly. A saltwater pool is still being sanitized by chlorine.

Before you dive into the fun, remember that saltwater pools require the same maintenance functions and still must be checked and balanced regularly, just like a traditional chlorine pool. Here’s how to do it.

Test the Water Daily

Whether your pool uses traditional chlorine or is equipped with a salt chlorine generator, make testing it a top priority, especially when your pool is used frequently.

Make sure to read and follow the product label instructions closely when dealing with pool chemicals. Proper dosing of pool chemicals is important for swimmer comfort.

Always test the water and make sure the free chlorine level never falls below 1 parts per million (ppm). Chlorine is the main sanitizer of your pool (and drinking water), and the more people in your pool, the more chlorine you may need.

Keep Water Balanced


If your eyes are irritated and the pool water is cloudy or looks green, the balance is probably off. Here's how to test it:

- Use strips that show chlorine, alkalinity, pH and cyanuric acid levels.
- Follow instructions on the package for how to submerge the strip.
- Compare color readings on the strip to the range on the product bottle.

Ideal water balance ranges for chlorine are 1-4 ppm; alkalinity, 80-120 ppm; pH, 7.2-7.6; cyanuric acid, 20-50 ppm.

Source:
SaltorChlorine.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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