RE/MAX 440
Cheryl Goedeke
701 W. Market Street
Perkasie, PA   18944
Phone: 267-664-2288
Office Phone: 215-453-7653
Fax: 267-354-6833
email: cheryl@remax440.com
Cheryl Goedeke

My Blog

Ten Ways to Save Money and Energy This Winter

January 3, 2013 3:58 am

Winter is finally here! Just in time for the New Year, here are some new ways you can save money and energy this season.

• Keep your thermostat at the lowest comfortable setting. Every degree above 68 can add three percent to the heating bill.
• Keep heating vents and registers clear. Make sure they are not blocked by draperies or furniture. Vents should also be cleaned regularly with a vacuum or broom.
• Caulk, re-caulk or add weatherstripping around windows and doors. This helps keep the cold out and the heat in. If caulking or weather stripping is cracked, remove it and reseal with new materials.
• Let the sun shine in. On sunny days, open drapes or blinds to allow natural solar heat to warm the house.
• Change air filters. Dirty filters can increase heating system operating costs. Change filters every month or so to help the unit run properly.
• Wrap water pipes. This will reduce heat loss from hot water lines and help to prevent pipes from freezing.
• Dress warmly, even indoors. This will allow a lower thermostat setting without sacrificing comfort.
• Make sure fireplace dampers fit tightly, and keep them closed when not using the fireplace. Add a glass fireplace screen, if possible.
• Have your heating system professionally checked to make sure it's running properly. This can prolong the life of the system, as well as reduce operating costs.
• Remove window air conditioning units during winter months.

Source: Georgia Power

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Keeping Your New Home Environmentally Sound

January 2, 2013 3:58 am

While the focus is often on redecorating and buying new furniture when moving into your new home, there are several steps you should take to ensure your home’s environment is safe and comfortable, in addition to aesthetically pleasing.

According to contractor Danny Lipford and Honeywell Home Environment, the following simple strategies will protect your home and its occupants for years to come…and save you money in the process.
  • Choosing the Right Supplies. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are harmful gases that can be emitted by some paints, solvents, cleaners, adhesives, furniture, and shelving. Try to find products with low or no VOC levels. When using products that contain high levels of VOCs, open windows or, better yet, turn on an air purifier that has a VOC pre-filter to help remove VOCs from the air that passes through the unit.
  • Pay Attention to the Temperature. Set back your thermostat about 10 degrees when you’re away from home for eight hours or more. You could shave as much as 10 percent off your energy bill without sacrificing comfort. Many of today’s thermostats can be programmed to adjust during the day and at night while you’re sleeping. When you are at home, try turning down the thermostat a few degrees and use a portable heater in the rooms you are in the most.
  • Watch Humidity Levels. A too-dry environment is not only bad for your family’s health, but for your home itself. Humidifiers offer solutions during dry winter months or in dry climates to help protect valuable wood furniture from drying out and cracking and prevent wood floors from buckling and separating.
  • Fight Dust. Pollutants like dust and mold that settle in the home can be attributed to poor air circulation. A whole room fan should be used to ventilate the home properly. Look for models that have a wide ventilation range and are also quiet.

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Best Cities for Wedded Bliss

January 2, 2013 3:58 am

A recent survey from Rent.com revealed some interesting facts about newlyweds, polling couples about combining households and their attitudes toward finances and quality of engaged and married life.

According to the survey, 75 percent of all respondents said that their overall quality of life has improved since moving in with their significant other. For the 25 percent of respondents that found living with their significant other to be stressful, the key areas of stress were not having their own space (42 percent), sharing household expenses (33 percent), and splitting up household chores (25 percent).

Finances are often a point of contention with couples, married or not. The good news is that 62 percent of respondents report that their financial situation has gotten better as a result of moving in with their significant other.

In addition to measuring couples’ attitudes, Rent.com also researched cities across the country, looking at cost of living, mean annual income, the unemployment rate, and rental inventory to identify 10 ideal cities for newlyweds. The website considers these locales both fun and affordable:
  • Austin, Tex. – Austin is the perfect home to inspire creative couples. A thriving art scene is a great way to experience unique date nights and meet other couples.
  • Raleigh/Durham, N.C . – Young professionals and new families are drawn to Raleigh for its affordability, friendliness, and favorable climate. Livable residential neighborhoods with the cultural benefits of a larger city make Raleigh/Durham the perfect place to settle down.
  • Dallas, Tex. – If you’re looking for a sports town, Dallas is the perfect new home. From watching professional sports to getting outdoors and playing yourself, active couples will never experience a dull moment in Dallas.
  • Kansas City, Mo. – Living in Kansas City offers a dynamic blend of affordability and high culture, combining both a renaissance of the arts and the warmth of a small town.
  • Houston, Tex. – One of the most culturally-rich cities in the nation, Houston offers everything from world-class museums to local farmers’ markets. Houston is great for both couples and new families, and boasts a thriving culinary scene.
  • Denver, Colo. – From craft beer culture to day trips to the Rocky Mountains, Denver is the city for adventurous newlyweds.
  • Minneapolis, Minn. – As the American Fitness Index’s “Fittest City in America,” Minneapolis is the most bike-friendly city in the nation. From lakes to parks, newlyweds will stay fit and active in Minneapolis.
  • Phoenix, Ariz. – Phoenix offers perpetual sunshine and colorful deserts for hiking and exploring. If outdoor adventures don’t suit your lifestyle, the city is also known to be a haven for foodies and families.
  • Washington, DC – A central location with a wide variety of job opportunities, Washington, DC offers something for everyone – shopping, entertainment, and cultural activities. It’s truly the city of compromise for opposites that attract.
  • Baltimore, Md. – A modern cultural center known for its hospitality, Baltimore offers a vibrant waterfront scene coupled with a laidback attitude. This city is perfect for couples looking for the comfort of a smaller hometown with the benefits of urban living.
Source: Rent.com

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10 Tips for Refinishing Your Hardwood Floors

January 2, 2013 3:58 am

Gleaming hardwood floors have long been a valuable component of any home. They are susceptible to wear and tear, however, so maintaining and refinishing when necessary is a must. The process doesn’t have to be as daunting or costly as it seems, however. Let the following steps be your guide:

Step 1 - Determine if Your Floor Needs Refinishing
Refinishing hardwood floors is often a better choice than simply replacing the flooring, because it costs less and takes less time. In some cases though, a floor might be damaged beyond repair. Consult a professional to determine whether to opt for a hardwood floor refinishing technique or new flooring.

Step 2 - Determine if Some of the Floor Planks Need Replacing
Sometimes 90 percent of the floor might be in good shape and only a few planks are in need of repair. Be sure to replace those boards before beginning the refinishing process. Since most planks will be connected using a groove-tongue joint, it will be slightly difficult to get one out, but it's not impossible.

Step 3 - Filling the Gaps
It's considered good practice to fill in the gaps at the ends of the floor planks before sanding, but you shouldn't waste time with every little crack. They're unavoidable, as wood tends to expand and contract due to humidity. Unless the gap is big enough that you think it might create problems during the hardwood floor refinishing process, feel free to skip it and save some time and energy.

Step 4 - Getting the Right Equipment
Some of the equipment you'll need for refinishing your floor will need to be bought or rented: sand paper (different weights); a drum sander; a palm sander; an edge sander; claw hammer; a vacuum cleaner; a buffer; a scraper; a brush; safety goggles; a dust mask; protection gloves; and knee pads.

Step 5 - Preparation
Since it usually gets quite messy when you refinish hardwood floors, a little preparation goes a long way. Make sure you turn off all vents that might take dust and sand particles across the house and only use ventilation that connects the room to the outside. It's also a good idea to use some wet sheets across entrances to the room you're working on for the same reasons.

Step 6 - Sanding
Sanding is probably the most important part of the process and you need to put all focus into it if you want your floor to look great at the end.

Step 7 - Cleaning
Use a broom and the vacuum to pick up the dust from the floor; never use any moisture to clean the floor. You'll also have to clean the walls and ceiling.

Step 8 - Buffing

Make sure the floor is clean before you start buffing it. You'll want to choose a screen for the buffer at the rental or hardware store that's around 100 grit, then carefully sweep it across the entire floor.

Step 9 - Staining
Staining is one of the last steps you'll have to take, but it's also the step where many make mistakes. Take extra care and time for this part of the process.

Step 10 - Finishing

If you're sloppy with finishing, all your work thus far is for naught. Take your time with this final step to achieve the best results for your floor.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Keep Children Safe at Home

December 31, 2012 3:56 am

While some safety measures around the house are routine, there are some potential hazards that could be dangerous for young children. According to information provided by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, since 1990, more than 200 infants and young children have died from accidentally strangling in window cords. With this in mind, here are a few tips provided by the Window Covering Safety Council (WCSC) reminding parents to practice window cord safety and to make safety a priority in the home:

• Install only cordless window coverings in homes with young children. Replace window blinds, corded shades and draperies manufactured before 2001 with today's safer products.
• Move all cribs, beds, furniture and toys away from windows and window cords, preferably to another wall.
• Make sure cribs are properly assembled and meet current safety standards, and that crib mattresses fit snugly.
• Keep all window pull cords and inner lift cords out of the reach of children. Make sure that tasseled pull cords are short and continuous-loop cords are permanently anchored to the floor or wall. Make sure cord stops are properly installed and adjusted to limit movement of inner lift cords.
• Lock cords into position whenever horizontal blinds or shades are lowered, including when they come to rest on a windowsill.

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How to Make Cohabitation Work

December 31, 2012 3:56 am

The majority of couples marrying today cohabited first, with U.S. Census reports revealing there are about 7.6 million unmarried couples living together. In light of this news, here is some advice on successfully sharing space with a significant other:

1. Talk money before the move. Discuss finances up front–even before you start looking at apartments. Before the apartment becomes something tangible, make sure you establish what each person is comfortable contributing financially. When you have this discussion, remember to include the cost for Internet, utilities, parking, and any other fees that may arise.

2. Respect personal space. When you move in, make sure you each give yourselves some space that is your own, especially if this is the first time you are moving in with a significant other. As crazy as you are about each other, spending every minute in the apartment together may drive you both a little batty. Ensure each person still has some alone time carved out for themselves.

3. Discuss décor. Hand in hand with respecting your significant other's personal space is respecting their personal decorating style—or lack thereof. Before either of you hang (or purge anything), sit down and talk about your decorating styles and how you can make them blend harmoniously.

4. Don't forget dates. Once you live together, it's easy to mistake seeing each other around the apartment for quality time. Be sure to make time for a night out on the town together or plan a special evening at home. Remember, this is your potential soul mate, not just a roommate you split the bills with.

5. Consider going halfsies on large purchases. Shared purchases are an interesting issue. To fill your apartment, you may need a new couch or dining room table—or you may just want that new big screen TV. So, who pays for this major expense? Consider splitting it 50/50 (or in whatever way makes financial sense for you as a couple). Making these purchases together shows your partner you're committed to the relationship and investing in your future together.

Source: Apartments.com

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The 7 Jobs You Shouldn't Ignore

December 31, 2012 3:56 am

Contractors across the country were recently surveyed to determine the most common home aches and pains, and how to remedy them before you have to seek emergency care.

7 Signs Your House Needs Professional Care 

1. Up on the Roof: If you notice loose shingles, have attic leaks, suspect chimney issues or see other signs of damage up high, call in a reputable roofing, gutter or chimney expert, or a handyman to give you great advice about what you need done.
2. Leaks don't fix themselves: Leaky faucets, running toilets and other small plumbing issues will just get worse, so do yourself a favor and get those fixed before major damage occurs. If you notice a jump in your water bill but haven't increased your usage, you likely have a hidden leak, which left undetected could lead to mold, wood rot and severe water damage.
3. Caulk it up: The caulking around your tub and shower prevents moisture penetration, which can lead to mold, tile and wall damage and warped cabinetry. Keeping everything watertight will save you a bundle, so be sure to repair any caulking failures. But don't stop there. All homes get cracks and voids in their outside walls over time. Look closely at where two boards come together, because cracks often start there. Also look for damage from animals that are looking for a way in. Caulk any cracks you see to avoid water penetration, subsequent wood rot and to keep the critters out.
4. Sparks fly: Lights that dim on their own schedule are a clear signal that you have an electrical problem. Experts say too many homeowners tolerate this situation for too long, which puts their homes at risk for electrical fire. Another often tolerated-too-long issue is when using one device causes another to switch off because you've blown a fuse. This is a sign you have a capacity or circuit box issue. Less dangerous but still signal-worthy are springy outlets that don't hold plugs. If you have any of these issues, call in a licensed, reputable electrician.
5. Drafty doors and windows: Improperly sealed windows and doors will bring cold air inside during the winter and let cooled air out in the summer, costing you big bucks on your energy bill. An energy audit can tell you where your leaks are and how to seal them.
6. Filter it out: HVAC experts say 60 percent of their service calls result from systems stressed by dirty air filters. Changing air filters regularly (every quarter or so; more if you have pets) can save you up to $100 each year on your energy bill, and will keep you from needing emergency repair. Many highly reputable heating and air conditioning companies offer maintenance plans that include an annual inspection. Doing this will give you an early alert to any issues you have with your entire HVAC system so you can stave off breakdowns.
7. Pump it up: Take a look at your sump pump from time to time. If it's in good shape and its batteries are good, it could save you thousands of dollars in flood damage. But you don't want to find out it needs repairs after the water starts rising. Get an annual inspection and check the batteries at least quarterly.

Source: Angie's List

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10 Tips for Homebuyers

December 28, 2012 3:56 am

Making the decision to buy a new home is a life-altering event…in a good way. But the process can be daunting. Take the following advice from CNNMoney into consideration before heading out on your home-buying journey.

1. Don't buy if you can't stay put. Given today’s challenging marketplace, don’t buy a home unless you can commit to staying there for at least a few years. The days of flipping for profit are long gone and you stand to lose money if you sell too soon after buying.

2. Shore up your credit. Securing a mortgage in today’s market requires excellent credit so take the time to clean up your credit report well before you begin looking for a home.

3. Be honest about what you can really afford. The rule of thumb is that you can buy housing that runs about two-and-one-half times your annual salary. But CNNMoney recommends using one of the many calculators available online to get a better handle on how your income, debts, and expenses affect what you can afford.

4. If you can't put down the usual 20 percent, you may still qualify for a loan. There are a variety of public and private lenders who, if you qualify, can provide options in terms of interest rates and down payments.

5. Schools affect home values. Even if children aren’t a part of your life now or in the near future, look at homes in areas supported by a good school system. Good schools are paramount for many homebuyers and have a direct impact on the value of your home.

6. Work with a real estate professional. Even though the Internet gives buyers unprecedented access to home listings, most new buyers (and many more experienced ones) are better off using a professional agent. Today’s market requires expert guidance through every stage of the home-buying process.

7. Choose carefully between points and rate. When picking a mortgage, you usually have the option of paying additional points - a portion of the interest that you pay at closing - in exchange for a lower interest rate. If you stay in the house for a long time - say three to five years or more - it's usually a better deal to take the points, says CNNMoney. The lower interest rate will save you more in the long run.

8. Get pre-approved. This will help you avoid the emotional rollercoaster of falling in love with houses you can’t afford. Not to be confused with pre-qualification, which is based on a cursory review of your finances, pre-approval from a lender is based on your actual income, debt and credit history.

9. Make an educated bid. Work with your real estate professional to make the right opening bid. Bids should be based on the sales trend of similar homes in the neighborhood, so review with your agent sales of similar homes in the last three months.

10. Hire a home inspector. In addition to the appraiser your lender hires, you should also hire your own home inspector, preferably an engineer with experience in doing home surveys in the area where you are buying. His or her job will be to point out potential problems that could require costly repairs down the road.

Source: Money.cnn.com.

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Winter Blues? Warm Up at Home

December 28, 2012 3:56 am

For many of us, winter means more time spent inside and less time spent in the great outdoors, which can often lead to a classic case of cabin fever and winter blahs. According to Debra Duneier, author and creator of EchoChi, with a few simple steps, you can transform your home into a place that makes you feel happier and healthier this winter:

• Use color creatively. Add warmth and excitement to your life by accessorizing your home with red, yellow and orange, says Duneier. These colors have a stimulating Chi (energy vibration) and have the energy of summer. This invigorates our environment, making us feel more optimistic and energized.

• Bake something. Turn on the oven to fight off the wintery chill. After all, who doesn’t feel better by the smell of chocolate chip cookies baking? Try a variety of ingredients like vanilla or cinnamon and experiment with baking an old family recipe, advises Duneier. Winter provides the perfect opportunity to slow down and reconnect to your home and family through baking.

• Use fragrance to bring the outdoors in. Scented candles can be especially helpful in the winter when we spend so much time indoors. Home fragrance can reconnect us to the natural world through our sense of smell. The scents of flowers, fresh rain, the forest, or ocean air are all essential to our well-being. Choose candles made of soy or bees wax with 100 percent cotton wick to ensure a toxic-free experience.

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Tips for Preventing Frozen Pipes

December 28, 2012 3:56 am

On average, an approximate one-quarter-million homes and offices have at least one room damaged by a frozen pipe per year. In order to ensure your home stays safe and your pipes don’t freeze, the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH)® suggests three easy-to-remember steps: Foam, dome and drip.

Foam: Insulate pipes exposed to the elements or cold drafts. For as little as $1 per 6’ of insulation, you can stop pipes from freezing and save energy. By keeping your water warmer, you reduce the amount of energy needed to heat water in the cold, winter months.

Dome: Place an insulating dome or other coverings on outdoor faucets and spigots to reduce the likelihood of water pipes freezing, expanding and causing a costly leak.

Drip: Allow a slow drip from your faucets to reduce the buildup of pressure in the pipes. Even if the pipes freeze, the released pressure in the water system will reduce the likelihood of a rupture. If you are going out of town and suspect the temperature will drop, turn off the water and open all of the taps to drain the water system. This way pipes won’t freeze and you won’t return home to a mess.

Your local home improvement store will have all of the tools and expertise you will need to complete these steps. Foam, dome and drip your way to a safe winter season, free of costly home repairs.

For more information, visit www.greatwinterweatherparty.org.

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